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is set to have broadband speeds 200 times faster than the u.s. average. go to our website for more questions and answers. thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. and i will see you next week. >>> your child gets into college. now the hard part -- how do you pay for it? we'll help you track down the money this hour. >>> and in these tough times, you might need to update your resumÉ. we've got some do's and don't's in the 4:00 p.m. eastern hour. >>> and 5:00, thousands of women take on walmart in a sex discrimination suit. it could be the most important case the u.s. supreme court hears this term. you're in the cnn news room, i'm fredricka witfield. >>> on the international front, rebel forces in libya say they are controlling two more key towns in their advance to tripoli. this is smoke hanging over the city of ras laneuf that where an opposition spokesman tells cnn government troops have pulled out of ports. both places were claimed by pro gadhafi forces at the start of the civil war. the next major city is moammar gadhafi's home town. rebel forces anticipate
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
on innocents here in the u.s. when will the government learn? from new york, defending freedom every night of the week, so long america! >> gregg: tripoli under attack right now. i'm gregg jarrett. a new round of air strikes by the international coalition and we're getting reports that air-raid sirens and explosions are being heard across the libyan capital and on calm's hometown. let's go right to steve harrigan. steve, what can you tell us. >> reporter: in the last few minutes we heard eight loud incoming ex pleogsz to the east of the city of tripoli. clearly audible. one round of three strikes, another round of five. we're not seeing the anti-aircraft fire that usually goes up. a remarkable shift in the battlefield. we are seeing the rebels advance quickly. they have taken four towns previously retreated. brega and one other. it's really being coalition powered that has paved the way targeting gadhafi forces and personnel carriers so the rebels have been able to advance so far without much of a fight. the government officials here say gadhafi forces are making a strategic retreat but it
the objective and u.s. involvement in the conflict. he did defend his decision to engage u.s. military forces in that conflict. in his weekly radio address today, he touted the successes of u.s. and coalition forces saying they have both helped to knock down moammar gadhafi's air defense mechanisms as well as push back his ground forces. the president said that he had to engage in this conflict to do to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that could destabilize an entire region, and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> reporter: but the president is facing mounting criticisms from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say there is a lack of congressional involvement in setting up u.s. policy in libya. and the president held a conference call with congressional leaders yesterday, trying to add
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
a command center. of course, it's been french jets, british jets and u.s. jets that have launched most of the air strikes. >> reza, we were told from the beginning that allied air pour power is only really protecting civilians. is that meaningful at this point? >> well, at this point there's no question. it's facilitating the push by the opposition forces west towards tripoli, the final destination. look at march 19th. that was the date when this no-fly zone was put in place. that's when opposition forces started pushing west. on saturday the air strikes softened up the artillery units. then it was brega, ras lanuf. the first little bit of resistance. the air strikes are pivotal in the progress of the rebel forces. >> and nato is supposed to take control of the no-fly zone today and the whole operation by the end of the week. does this matter to the rebels? do they feel this is what's helping them? >> it will matter if the air strikes are deescalated. with nato taking control, there are some member states that are not as enthusiastic as others about the aggressive nar of the air strike
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
people about the u.s. role in libya, our sandra endo has the latest. >> reporter: the president is expected to layout the objective in libya. that speech is set for monday night. he continues to defend his decision in the conflict. in the weekly radio address, the president touted the successes of the efforts so far saying that u.s. and coalition forces have successfully knocked down moammar gadhafi's defense mechani mechanisms. the president says the u.s. had to get involved in order to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there is a crisis somewhere in the world. i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized. when someone like moammar gadhafi threatened a blood bath to destabilize an entire region and the entire international community is coming together to save thousands of lives, it is in our national interest to act. >> reporter: the president is facing criticism from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle say there is a lack of congressional involvement in libya. president obama yesterday held a conference call with le
now entered it's second week. why the u.s. is now trying to take a back seat in the operation. >>> one maryland county is trying to put more room between protesters and funerals, how they plan to do it. >>> the fbi says she stuffed nearly $80,000 in cash into her underwear, i'm kelly mcpherson, coming up on eyewitness news, we'll detail additional charges for ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> welcome back to eyewitness news saturday morning. i'm gigi barnett. >>> i'm tim williams. it is around 30 degrees at bwi, marshal in baltimore a degree or so warmer. it will not be a very warm day overall. the sky is brightening. we have clouds but the sun is peaking through the horizon. we have a good bit of cloud cover right now. that is ahead of a storm system that is moving in. it will be passing on our south side over the next 12 hours or so. we will start to see the potential for snow showers that we'll talk about in a moment. for today 46 degrees, chilly with times of clouds and sun. 30 degrees, mostly cloudy with a little snow late. we're talking after midnight. your day's events today we'll be oka
, democratic congressman dennis kucinich speaks out. he wants to ban all funding from u.s. operations in that country. we ask him why live. nuclear mistake. operators say a strike in radioactivity that prompted evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an offic
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
of the no-fly zone, but the u.s. still will play an important role as a nato member nation. still unclear exactly what the u.s. role will be, and the extent of it. still you will expect to see american planes flying over libya. kmapd >> we expect nato will take over the no-fly zone this weekend and then the next piece, the third and final piece is the mission to protect civilians. nato, it is my understanding nato has agreed to that in principle and will this weekend decide on the procedures and the timing of accepting that mission. but i think that will probably occur in the very near future. >> so you heard there maybe this weekend nato could be taking over, but still a lot needs to be decided. in the meanwhile, opposition forces are battling government troops for control of ajdabiya, a strategically located city in libya you see there on the map. rebels say they've now taken control of that city. refugees have moved into makeshift camps outside of the city. coalition planes have taken out some of the tanks being used by gadhafi's forces in those battles. libya claims the coalition airs
in the program. moving on to libya, a country where our u.s. military is now involved in coalition air strikes helping to turn the tide in one city. rebels able to gain control of ajdabiya. the fight, a pierce one and bodies of more than a dozen men loyal to qaddafi scattered among the burned out artillery. troops were forced to retreat to the west. the rebels promise to march toward tripoli. steve, under the cover of the allied air strikes victory for the rebels. >>reporter: harris, this is a major turn around for the rebel force that is being formed and growing. they retreated for two weeks before this . now with the allied air strikes they were able to come out and launch an assault and take a town they had fled from. ajdabiya was a ghost town and it was the allied air strikes that were key. they targeted tanks and vehicles and supply lines . soldier running out of fuel and food were forced to retreat in the end. >> could we see this repeat in other cities? >> that's what the rebels are hoping for and asking for. a battle is shaping up in miraheta and once again ally airlines are pounding q
for the libya operation. that will happen in two or three days, then the current coalition led by the u.s., britain and france can stand down. now we want to go back to cnn's nic robertson joining us from tripoli where that dramatic event unfolded yesterday in the hot hotel. we're hearing the woman has been released. do we know if this is true? >> reporter: well, government officials say she has been released. but so far the government officials here sometimes -- some of the things they tell us don't turn out to be as they tell us directly. when the government spokesman was asked if we could interview her by some journalists who said they talked to her family and had given the green light to interview her now, he made it sound like it was impossible. so, it's really not clear if she's actually been released yet or not. maybe we'll get more information on that tomorrow. when i challenged him about the fact that he had been accusing her of being a prostitute against the fact that her family says she was a law student, this is what he had to say. >> yes, nic. >> the family, you have been des
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
. the u.s. counts on him to keep pressure on al qaeda in yemen and is reportedly trying to broker a deal. by phone, a newspaper editor said the president and the nation are running out of time. >> i don't think it will take more than a week. i believe he'll step down less than a week if he is asked or we could see a civil war after it the week. >> reporter: and now supporters and -- nentss opponents. the violence happening as secretary gates was here. reforms clearly not happening fast enough for the thousands in the streets across the region. we expect to see more protests here in jordan and in syria after funerals to bury the dead. and in yemen, those talks continue, but at this point, everything seems to be at a very intense stalemate. >> ron allen, thanks. and for more we're joined by mark halperin. good morning. civilians are being targeted in many places. yet it's only libya where the world seems to be reapgting with the no-fly zone and no drive zone. let me start off by playing what president obama said on that very question this morning in his weekly radio address. >> the united
monday night to explain the u.s. role in libya. and this morning in his weekly radio address, he defended sending forces there, and said the mission has been a success. david kerley is at the white house. david, the president appears to have gone on the offense, taking a lot of heat from both sides. >> reporter: he has taken a lot of criticism. you're starting to see the rollout this morning of the message from this white house that this is going well. and trying to explain to the american people what the president hopes to accomplish in libya. the weekly address today. tomorrow, you'll see the secretary of state and the defense secretary, on the sunday shows. and the speech by the president on monday night. the president spoke to 21 members of congress on a conference call, trying to nullify their concerns last night. >> and nato is supposed to take over libya tomorrow. how involved will the u.s. be in day-to-day operations there? >> reporter: that's a message that has not been very clear. the president says the u.s. is moving back from the leadership role as nato takes over. but the u.s
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
ready to take off. and for the u.s., firing off cruise missiles, new video from the "uss stout." they have launched around 200 cruise missiles since this began eight days ago. the president briefly discussed this during his weekly white house message. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there is a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe when innocent people are being brutalized when someone like gadhafi threaten as a bloodbath that can destabilize an entire region and the international community is prepared to come together to save thousands of lives, it's in our national interest to act. >> we are expecting to hear much more from president obama. and we talk to the american people about libya and the american involvement there. we will deliver an address from the national defense university in washington, d.c., scheduled for 7:30 eastern time. see that live right here on cnn. developments in japan as well. we need to turn there now. work has stopped at two of the damaged nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. radiation level in standin
this morning. there is a nice shot of the u.s. capitol building well lit on a cold morning across the area. it is monday, march 28th, 2011 and good morning. >> good morning to you all. tucker. >> yes. >> i said it wasn't as bad as i thought it who be this morning. i thought it who be chillier. but i didn't have to stand out in it in a long time. >> nice when the chauffeured limousine picks you up. >> who told you? >> for the rest of the us, it is mighty cold. >> see. i'm going to have so much fun this week. >> temperatures in the 20s and 30s. and for those of you taking the bus to work or school, it will be very cold. check out the sunrise right at 7:00 a.m. so there you go. let's take a look at these current temperatures. here in the city at reagan national, 32 degrees. most of the area, upper 20s and low 30s. wind are not to bad out of the north. we should be dry with partly sunny conditions as we have a storm passing to the south. these temperatures not where they should be. we'll be in the mid- to upper 40s. cool afternoon, 47 degrees. tomorrow looks bright and sunny. >> milder too, ri
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)